The Dusk and Dawn Quilt

I made this quilt in May 2020 while testing a pattern for designer, Brittany Tunison, of White Plains Quilts. I was able to share some sneak peeks online, but not a full reveal until today, when the pattern was made public. It is her first pattern and I’m honored to have been able to sew it, help with edits and finish with this baby quilt in the weeks before its release. Considering I was in my “no new fabric, use what you have” phase, I opted for the baby size. That phase was driven by being frugal as much as it was being forced by “non-essential” businesses still being closed.

When I first saw the pattern draft, I knew immediately which fabrics I wanted to use. I’d been holding onto this Art Gallery Fabric, Lugu by Jessica Swift, for a few months. Those owls drew me in the first time I saw this collection & I’d been saving it for a project where they could shine & be the focal point. Seriously, how fun & vibrant is this print?

Lugu, by Jessica Swift for Art Gallery Fabrics

Initially, I chose Art Gallery Fabrics Pure Solids for the accents and then decided to add some with small print. It meant setting aside some of my HST and creating more, but I’m glad I did; I think it was just the right amount of contrast, but still having some fine details.

This pattern has the same size blocks for every size quilt; the quantity you make is the difference between the finished sizes. I thought that was great planning. I knew I just wanted to make a baby quilt, but let’s say you’re creating this with scraps and you want a long-term project. You could continue making blocks and then size “up” when you had made enough to suit yourself.

Quilt in progress

Half-square triangles. Sometimes I love them, sometimes I don’t. I’m learning that to love them more, I need to make them more often, so this was a task in improving my skills! And let’s face it, those “squaring up trimmings” are like happy confetti!

Choosing binding

Not only did I love the owl print in this collection, I was also fond of this fuchsia print with feathers, geometric lines and crescent moons. Having enough for a single piece backing was almost celebratory! If you’ve seen the backs of many of my quilts, I often piece them & even use leftover scraps from the front or make an additional block so that there is some coordinating reference on each side, once it’s finished. I actually don’t have many finished quilts that are backed with a single fabric. This worked out perfectly & I was even happier to have this mustard print for the binding. I think it frames the front well and pulls in the tone found in the feather graphic on the back.

Swirls and Stars for the quilting
Owl in Nature; binding completed
A glimpse of each side

I enjoyed making this quilt and intend to make a larger version in another color-way in the future. I think a scrappy version could be interesting or even a holiday theme, or dark background. Possibilities are endless. Being a quick finish, with easy to follow instructions, make it even better.

Many thanks to Brittany for choosing me to test this pattern. Any time I can use my editing background while also sewing/quilting, it sure feels like a good day. Congratulations to her on this first design. If you’re looking for a new pattern, go give Brittany a follow and considering adding this one to your library or pattern collection.

Now, to tuck this little lovey away and save for the future!

All photos and text property of Two Terriers Studio. Not to be duplicated or used without permission. This is a non-sponsored post. All opinions are my own; not paid.

The Woodstock Bag

One of the first designers I worked with as a pattern tester is Natalie Santini, of Sew Hungry Hippie. She is a gem – creative, talented, spunky, no-nonsense and always coming up with new projects. She loves COLOR and so do I. Fast forward to today…more than a year and a half since our paths crossed, and it’s release day for her Woodstock Bag pattern. Pattern Release days are exciting times. Ironic, that for two people who love bright & bold fabric, I made it in black cork and camo. It’s spring, but thanks to Covid-19, we’ve all been in quarantined/sheltered in place. Maybe there’s still a vibe of winter around here. Or you know me well and know I almost always wear black, so this matches.

The Woodstock Bag is a waist (or “fanny-pack”) style accessory, but the adjustable strap also allows for it to be worn over the shoulder. The zipper closure at the top will keep your contents secure. This design lets you move about & shop, hands-free, without the worry of setting your bag down. It is roomier than you might expect, thanks to darts, which expand the front panel just a bit.

This pattern is a quick make & I used supplies I have on hand. Notice the mixed metals, between the D-ring and the adjustable slide? I’d like to say it’s a creative design choice, but it was literally a supply availability issue. Maybe it will be a 2020 trend? Me, a trendsetter? Now that’s funny. If you’ve not sewn with cork, faux leather or vinyl, give it a try. Natalie carries a lot of these items in her shop and it’s simpler to use than you might imagine. I highly recommend a teflon foot for your machine, to minimize “drag”, but other than that, I’ve not made other adjustments in sewing cork. I look forward to making more of these in other textiles and colors, which will be posted to my Instagram account (@twoterriersstudio) as they are finished.

Take a minute and go visit Natalie on Instagram (@sewhungryhippie) where you’ll see links to her tutorials, patterns and MORE. Allow time – it’s a creative spot & if you’re like me, you might be there awhile.

I’m thankful for the opportunity to test patterns before they are released to the public. It lets me stretch my skills, finish a new project, work with other makers and incorporate my education and former career in editing. The whole thing makes me happy. Natalie, THANK YOU!

All photos and content property of Two Terriers Studio, not to be reproduced without consent. While I share what I love by other makers, this is not a paid or sponsored post.