Firefly Cabins Quilt

Have you ever purchased fabric for one project and when you finished, you wished you had more yardage for something else? This Big Sky collection by Annie Brady for Moda Fabrics is that fabric for me. The first time I saw it, the nature scenes, animals and colors just grabbed me, but I didn’t have an intended project. My yardage choices were random, because I didn’t really have a plan, but I knew the right thing would come along. I didn’t want to miss out on this beautiful collection. Fast forward a year (or more) and the Firefly Cabins Quilt pattern by Brittany Tunison for White Plains Quilts came my way. I knew right then, that this was the pattern for this fabric I’d been saving.

There’s something to be said for simple, efficient patterns. Firefly Cabins is an efficient, yet still so interesting pattern, in my opinion. I like to sew or create most days, and sometimes, being able to quickly put a quilt or gift together is just what I need. I never want my work to look rushed or half-done, but I often have so many things in progress, that the one “simple” finish is a blessing. What I like about this pattern is the repetitive nature of the blocks, the ability to showcase the fabrics in larger swatches and the option to chain piece. There is a time investment in cutting, and we all know that the best cutting accuracy leads to the best finished product. However, because of these block designs, once the strips are cut, chain piecing fits right in for a rapid finish.

As most of my readers probably notice, I choose and use bold prints far more often than solids. I am slowly learning to incorporate low volume prints and solids into my fabric stash and luckily, this Art Gallery Fabrics Pure Element Solid in “Honey” was the perfect match. It’s just what I needed (and fortunately, already had!).

Firefly Cabins on a beautiful fall day
Firefly Cabins by Two Terriers Studio, November 2020

Another feature of this pattern are the center set blocks which would be perfect for fussy-cutting a favorite image. Mine aren’t necessarily fussy-cut, but the repetition of animals in the largest blocks makes me smile.

Longarm quilting by Deb, Owl Quilt It

I send a lot of my quilts to be longarm quilted, since I’m not always 100% thrilled with my own quilting on a small domestic machine. I do quilt my own, when the project is smaller or I think I’ll be happy with straight line stitching or a simplistic design, but more often, I lean toward a theme and need some talent from other professionals! This leaf theme, edge to edge design, was just the ticket. It mimics the fabric design and pulls in that feel of nature. If you look closely, you’ll see that the thread choice is a pale yellow. I rarely venture into colored thread for quilting, but Deb of Owl Quilt It, encouraged me that this would be a good choice and she was exactly right.

Binding by machine, not hand, this time.

I opted to bind this quilt by machine, rather than my “go to” hand-binding. I have a funny relationship with quilt binding. I want it to be perfect, but I also want it to be DONE. By hand is always more precise for me, but I recognize the only way I will improve in machine binding is to do it & practice. What’s that saying about 10,000 hours? Goodness, how many quilts would it take to fill 10K hours of practice?

All Done…Firefly Cabins Quilt by Two Terriers Studio

Finished. This quilt has a pieced backing with the Moda Bleached White, and two prints from Big Sky. The binding is also a third color-way of the Big Sky leaf motif. A single piece backing is clean & neat, but I also like to think of the back of a quilt as an option for more interest and a hint of what might be found on the front side. It’s almost like two quilts, literally bound together.

The pattern for this quilt can be purchased from Brittany Tunison (@brittanytunison) on Instagram.

I’m curious if you purchase fabric you love first and then find the project, or only purchase with a project plan in mind. Tell me in the comments! To be honest, I’m a little bit of both.

Happy quilting…

All photos and content property of Two Terriers Studio and not to be duplicated or shared without written consent.

Hooked

Hooked. I don’t know how to crochet, and I can only sort of knit, but this fabric collection by Mathew Boudreaux, aka Mister Domestic, had me hooked the minute I saw the sheep. Well, the sheep, the text, the readers, the florals. OK, I like all the colors too. Sign me up. Working again, for the third time with the Mister Domestic Master Maker group for a fabric collection blog party release was a lure too. As is Art Gallery Fabric. Have you felt it? It’s magic and sews up beautifully. “Hooked”; it hooked me.

Hooked, a collection by Mr. Domestic for Art Gallery Fabric

When I thought of Hooked, it obviously brought to mind visions of crochet & knitting projects. What does every yarn enthusiast need? A project bag. I mean, yarn and hooks are portable, so a unique and handmade bag is in order. I think the most challenging aspect of the project was deciding which fabrics to use. The pattern choice came easily as I’d been admiring the Juniper Basket, by Svetlana Sotak of sotakhandmade.blogspot.com. Her patterns are so well written and easy to understand.

The Juniper basket; made by Two Terriers Studio 2020

This Juniper Basket comes in two sizes and features an interior patch pocket and an exterior zipper pocket. The handles at each side, in addition to the drawstring closure make for several interesting design elements. I opted to make my own drawstrings from one of the prints in the collection, but this could easily be swapped for cording or a decorative ribbon. When I’m working with a new fabric collection, I’m inspired to incorporate as many fabrics as possible. I like to show as much of the artist’s work as I can. This basket fit the bill perfectly; I used six different prints in this one project.

Juniper Basket
Pockets are a fun place to add an element of surprise

Once the Juniper Basket was complete, I knew I wanted to also tie my love for quilting into this blog party. I believe winter crochet projects are made better by snuggling under a handmade quilt, right? We all love a good quilt, don’t we?

Large blocks to highlight the intricate designs

New fabric collections are a fine time to let a quilter’s talent shine. I looked at many intricate quilting patterns and kept coming back to the idea of letting the fabric speak for itself. To me, this collection has several stories of its own; between the sheep, spectacles, historic crochet blocks and more…it made sense to let that be the forward message. I also wanted bigger blocks so that the images had more space to be seen.

Time to bind

The pattern I chose is called Star Light Star Bright, by Craftsy. I’ve had this pattern in my “things to make someday” notebook; someday became NOW. Meet the merging of the pattern I’ve been saving with the fabric that has just arrived, courtesy of Mathew. I’ll let you in on a secret. That green solid fabric shown above…it’s an Art Gallery Fabric Pure Elements solid. Look familiar? It coordinates with Mathew’s last collection, “Playroom”, for which I also made several projects. I didn’t think anyone would mind if I added an earlier 2020 fabric into this new quilt. Honestly, I think it matches perfectly with those little highlights in the crochet blocks. It’s also what I do; blending past & present. I like the fact that his collections coordinate and are cohesive, when you see them lined up against each other.

Star Light Star Bright Quilt

Here’s another not-so secret, secret. I like a crinkly textured quilt, that just gets more cozy with every wash. I’ve yet to wash this one, but look at that texture. Do you see the sheep? Hello little cuties. While I’m not personally looking forward to chilly winter nights, I am looking forward to sitting under this quilt.

Hooked, on a glorious fall day

In addition to the AGF Pure Elements solid in Warm Wave, I added Pure Elements in Snow for the corners of the star block. I wanted it to “pop” against the other prints. I think it’s just enough of a frame to let the other colors shine. I backed this quilt in the sheep print, “wool origins”. It’s precious.

Star Light Star Bright Quilt and Juniper Basket made by Two Terriers Studio, 2020

I’m thankful for the opportunity to work with such talented makers, fabric designers and fabric manufacturers. It truly is an aspect of sewing and quilting that I never could have imagined just a couple of years ago. Artists continue to create new designs and my fellow makers encourage me and one another; they raise the bar in a way that is inspiring. You all push me to be better. Thank you.

Mathew, thank you again for this fabric. I appreciate it and had a lot of fun sewing for your latest collection release.

The Dusk and Dawn Quilt

I made this quilt in May 2020 while testing a pattern for designer, Brittany Tunison, of White Plains Quilts. I was able to share some sneak peeks online, but not a full reveal until today, when the pattern was made public. It is her first pattern and I’m honored to have been able to sew it, help with edits and finish with this baby quilt in the weeks before its release. Considering I was in my “no new fabric, use what you have” phase, I opted for the baby size. That phase was driven by being frugal as much as it was being forced by “non-essential” businesses still being closed.

When I first saw the pattern draft, I knew immediately which fabrics I wanted to use. I’d been holding onto this Art Gallery Fabric, Lugu by Jessica Swift, for a few months. Those owls drew me in the first time I saw this collection & I’d been saving it for a project where they could shine & be the focal point. Seriously, how fun & vibrant is this print?

Lugu, by Jessica Swift for Art Gallery Fabrics

Initially, I chose Art Gallery Fabrics Pure Solids for the accents and then decided to add some with small print. It meant setting aside some of my HST and creating more, but I’m glad I did; I think it was just the right amount of contrast, but still having some fine details.

This pattern has the same size blocks for every size quilt; the quantity you make is the difference between the finished sizes. I thought that was great planning. I knew I just wanted to make a baby quilt, but let’s say you’re creating this with scraps and you want a long-term project. You could continue making blocks and then size “up” when you had made enough to suit yourself.

Quilt in progress

Half-square triangles. Sometimes I love them, sometimes I don’t. I’m learning that to love them more, I need to make them more often, so this was a task in improving my skills! And let’s face it, those “squaring up trimmings” are like happy confetti!

Choosing binding

Not only did I love the owl print in this collection, I was also fond of this fuchsia print with feathers, geometric lines and crescent moons. Having enough for a single piece backing was almost celebratory! If you’ve seen the backs of many of my quilts, I often piece them & even use leftover scraps from the front or make an additional block so that there is some coordinating reference on each side, once it’s finished. I actually don’t have many finished quilts that are backed with a single fabric. This worked out perfectly & I was even happier to have this mustard print for the binding. I think it frames the front well and pulls in the tone found in the feather graphic on the back.

Swirls and Stars for the quilting
Owl in Nature; binding completed
A glimpse of each side

I enjoyed making this quilt and intend to make a larger version in another color-way in the future. I think a scrappy version could be interesting or even a holiday theme, or dark background. Possibilities are endless. Being a quick finish, with easy to follow instructions, make it even better.

Many thanks to Brittany for choosing me to test this pattern. Any time I can use my editing background while also sewing/quilting, it sure feels like a good day. Congratulations to her on this first design. If you’re looking for a new pattern, go give Brittany a follow and considering adding this one to your library or pattern collection.

Now, to tuck this little lovey away and save for the future!

All photos and text property of Two Terriers Studio. Not to be duplicated or used without permission. This is a non-sponsored post. All opinions are my own; not paid.

Catch and Release Blog Party

Today is the day! It’s my turn to reveal my creations for the Catch & Release Blog Party hosted by Mister Domestic (@misterdomestic) for Art Gallery Fabrics. This moment is a bit surreal for me. I’m a mostly self-taught sewing enthusiast and quilter, who has admired Matthew Boudreaux and his design work, tutorials and fabric for quite some time. I’ve learned so much from him, I’m a fan; and yet, he chose me to participate in his Catch & Release Blog Party. Me?! Yes, me. Great things happen when you show up and say yes.

In May 2019, Matthew put out a call to micro-influencers on Instagram, those with less than 5,000 followers, to participate in his fabric launch and blog party. As he told the story of his river themed collection, it reminded me of all the memories made with my family during summers at the beach. His story resonated with me and I jumped in. I submitted my proposal, crossed my fingers, and said a prayer that I’d be included. I hoped that my idea would be “enough”. Matthew sent me a reply two days later, “Love this idea and the story behind it. Yes please.” Wait, Mister Domestic messaged me? I may have re-read it several times and then there was shrieking. A happy dance ensued. Then slight panic, “oh my…this is real. I need to make it great”.

Catch & Release in the Two Terriers Studio = bags, bucket hats and babies. I wanted to highlight Matthew’s gorgeous fabric collection in as many ways possible. I needed (i.e. wanted) them all. There’s something so perfect about the feel of Art Gallery Fabrics. I wish you could reach through the screen and touch it. But you can’t, so you may need to get some for yourself.

by Two Terriers Studio, 2019

The first thing I made was the Santorini Tote. If you’re spending a day at the river, you’re likely going to need a tote bag. Maybe that’s just me. The Santorini Tote is a pattern by Natalie (@sewhungryhippie), and it’s one of my favorites. Natalie’s patterns are clear and concise and also easy to modify for size or style, if you choose. This tote is large, fully-lined, has an interior zipper pocket and a zip-top closure. I used the Fat Jelly Braid, a foundation paper piecing tool, purchased from the Fat Quarter Shop (@fatquartershop) to create the herringbone panel. I felt that it carried through with a fish theme and was one way to incorporate all the fabrics across both sides of the tote.

When I think of fishing along a riverbank, do you know what comes to mind? It’s bucket hats. It seems to be required gear for fisherman. Reversible bucket hats? Even better! Oh my word, the combinations are endless with just three pieces in this pattern.

Pattern by Betz White; made by Two Terriers Studio with Catch and Release by Mister Domestic
Reversible Bucket Hat by Two Terriers Studio; pattern by Betz White

I tried to sketch a fish for the t-shirt appliqué and it was sub-par. I tried again and still didn’t love it. Third time was not the charm. “This IS for the blog party, it has to be right”, kept playing in my head. I turned to Sizzix (@sizzix_quilting) and lo and behold, they have a fish die-cut. Done! What better combination than the die-cut fish and those beautiful blue scales?

Sizzix die-cut; fabric by Mister Domestic for Art Gallery Fabrics

My family and friends call me “the baby whisperer” and I love it. With that said, it was only natural to sew for children in this project. Wait until you see them! First up, this handsome boy with the big blue eyes. How stylish is he with his reversible bucket hat and appliquéd t-shirt? I don’t think he could be any cuter. I know, I know…I spent days sewing all these accessories, but the hat, shirt and tote are all background noise right now. It’s OK… let’s just celebrate Baby W!

Next, Miss L. She is so sweet and this denim sundress features a pieced/patchwork bodice. Matthew recommended a few AGF Pure Solids and I incorporated them into this dress along with the prints. I have to add, these photos of her are candid; no coaching or posing. Just adorable.

My sewing has mostly consisted of two-dimensional objects, but I wanted to add something more. I don’t have much experience making toys, but I thought they could easily round-out this project. Remember that comment about my fish sketch being sub-par? Yeah, still true. Thankfully, I remembered seeing a pattern for “Catnip Fish” in a book, That Handmade Touch by Svetlana Sotak (@sotakhandmade). I added a small ribbon tab so that I could string them up for the photo shoot, and later for wall decor.

Pattern by Svetlana Sotak, made by Two Terriers Studio
Patient long enough; it’s a wrap. Tote, hat, fish and appliqué by Two Terriers Studio 2019

It’s been a long while since I took care of toddlers around water and rocky terrain, but I quickly remembered that when THEY are done, it’s done. Special thanks to Liz for the extra set of hands and the zippered bag with toddler bribery treats.

And that’s it. My reveal.

If there were only some way for me to share my appreciation for the experience Matthew has given me. If you know him or have seen his tutorials, you have a glimpse of what the last four months have been for me. Matthew is joy, positivity, inspiration, laughs (my husband steps out of his office to say hi when he hears Matthew laughing on the phone!), mentor, photo coach and now, I’m going to say he’s my friend. Each week, Matthew has brought the team together in a face time chat. He asked us to rise to the occasion, not for him and this launch, but for ourselves. From 400 applicants, he chose 30, and by doing so connected makers from around the world. We are different in age, gender, geography, skills and interests. We are connected because we each took a leap of faith and submitted a proposal. And it was Matthew who said YES to US.

In my one on one mentoring call, I was embarrassingly giddy. In an instant, Matthew had a read on me and my business and sewing goals. His observation floored me. He literally looked me in the eye and verbalized what I’d been feeling for months. What I’d only quietly shared with my immediate family. He spoke about where this business of mine should and could be going. How? I still don’t know, but it was the validation I needed. If you’re not sure about showing up and saying yes, I’d encourage you to do so. I could never have imagined what I’ve gained from having a little faith in myself and taking that risk several months ago. Blog Party teammates, you INSPIRE me! Weeks of witnessing your creativity – I’m still in awe and I look forward to seeing what else you create. For Matthew, thank you so much for including me. For saying yes. It’s been fabulous. I’m grateful.

This is not a sponsored post; if I love something, I say so. All photos and content are property of Two Terriers Studio.